CFD Article

Considividi l’articolo

In the design of HVAC systems it is common practice to make important decisions regarding plant design based on construction practice or purely theoretical analytical bases. For example, we know that the possibility of creating full-air systems for winter The glass walls of environments are known to avoid the formation of condensation on them. We could go for a long time with examples in this regard. Although it is a theoretical and theoretical knowledge, it is an integral part of the experience of a designer.

 

CFD Article
Figure 1: Air flow speed on a NACA-0012 profile – Source: Direct Numerical Simulation of Flows over an NACA-0012 Airfoil at low and Moderate Reynolds Numbers (NASA)

In order to satisfy this growing demand for accuracy and precision, designers can resort to an extremely powerful tool: computational fluid dynamics , in short CFD. The use of CFD is to obtain a numerical solution, calculated through recursive methods, of the complex Navier-Stokes equations that, as is known, govern the dynamics of fluids. In practice, computational fluid dynamics makes it possible to give precise and punctual shape, in time and space to the often smoky analytical solutions which, even when obtainable, appear to be too complex for use in practical design.

Returning to the example, air exposure of rooms with high heights, we know that in order to limit the phenomenon of air stratification is necessary to provide considerable air flow (at least 5/6 volumes / hour). But exactly, what is the air flow needed to achieve acceptable air comfort? To this question, each designer will respond by providing his version, based on his previous experience. The CFD instead of working with certainty: by setting the model correctly and assuming adequate conditions it is possible to predict the temperature. In this way, thanks to the CFD,

An interesting consideration, therefore, can be made regarding the use of CFD for the design of HVAC systems: computational fluid dynamics Why this apparent contradiction? The CFD allows users to be pushed towards higher levels of accuracy.

 

To better understand the possibilities of CFD, but also the related criticalities, it is certainly useful to analyze the typical work-flow of a fluid dynamics simulation. The steps you need to get reliable and physically consistent results can be summarized as follows:

  1. Pre-Processing
  2. Model validation
  3. Post-Processing

Pre-Processing includes all preparatory and necessary activities for the start of numerical simulations. First of all it will be the control volume, ie the control volume; in order to obtain consistent results, the geometry must have a high level of detail. Once the geometry has been established, the physical model is defined, setting the equations that define the object of the simulation Choosing the correct equations that govern the simulation of fundamental importance to the correctness This phase of the process is defined as the so-called boundary conditions, as well as the hypotheses Once the Pre-Processing is over, it is necessary to validate the model just defined to allow its use. However, the validation of the model is the most complex step in the field of computational fluid dynamics; during validation it is in fact necessary to carry out the following operations:

1 ..    Mesh design : a “mesh” is defined as the discretization of the control volume. Mesh is made up of large cells of various shapes and sizes decided by the designer: for each cell the program will calculate the properties of the fluid (velocity, pressure, etc.). The realization of the mesh is, excluding the actual computational time, the longest operation in the field of CFD simulations and obviously has a fundamental importance. “Meshing”, as well as related issues, is available here [NOTES: Add link to the entry about “meshing”].

impeller

Figure 2: Mesh of a centrifugal pump – Source: truegrid.com/cfdgallery

 

2 ..    Selection and setting of the solver : Once the mesh is built, it is necessary to choose the most appropriate solver for the application in question. Without going into the details of the complex algorithms that hide behind the abbreviations (PISO, SIMPLE, etc.) that are typically encountered when approaching CFD, it is necessary to know that each solver calculates the numerical solution through iterative algorithms. The starting equations are the same, but the order in which they are solved varies, as well as the use of numerical correctors necessary to improve the stability of the simulation.

3 ..    Obtaining the preliminary solution : Once you have chosen the most suitable solution, you can finally launch a preliminary simulation. The simulator will return a solution. This must first of all be compared with the analytical solutions: is the solution If the answer is yes, you can proceed with the validation of the model.

4 ..    Convergence controls : obtaining an acceptable solution is certainly not sufficient to consider the model realized as validated. Later it will be necessary to proceed with the simulation to refine the solution. If this step is also successfully passed, the model can finally be considered validated.

HVAC simulation

Figure 3: Air stream lines inside data center – Source: simscale.com

 

Once a correct and stable computational model has been developed, it will be possible to simulate the different conditions required in the design field. The results of the simulations, however, will be endless tables of numbers, in fact incomprehensible. To translate these results into something usable, post-processing tools must be used to get the most interesting results.

 

We want to give taste to the design that computational fluid dynamics can help solve, as well as give an idea of ​​how to complex it can be correctly set up CFD simulations. However, it must be remembered that the use of CFD is not a substitute for traditional design tools: in order to implement correctly and physically sensible fluid dynamic model it is in fact necessary to have a good command of the analytical equations governing the dynamics of fluids, or the already mentioned Navier-Stokes equations. Furthermore, in order to obtain useful and coherent solutions, it is necessary that the designer correctly circumscribes the problem by sending it, avoiding waste of time and energy in useless, if not harmful, simulations.

 

The following two tabs change content below.
Ing. Gaetano Trovato

Ing. Gaetano Trovato

Progettista e Consulente per importanti società ed enti nel settore HVAC e dell’energia, sia in ambito civile terziario che industriale ed è titolare e fondatore di STT ENGINEERING. E’ autore di numerosi articoli scientifici su riviste internazionali e nazionali nel settore HVAC, della cogenerazione e dell’efficienza energetica. Si occupa di simulazioni CFD principalmente nel settore impiantistivo e dello scambio termico e del controllo della contaminazione ambientale (cleanroom). EGE (esperto gestione energia) certificato  UNI CEI 11339 settore civile ed industriale. Perito e Consulente Tecnico di Ufficio Tribunale di Milano (isc. Settore Termotecnica ed Energia). Membro AICARR (Associazione Italiana Condizionamento dell’aria, ASCCA (Associazione Contaminazione e Controllo dell’aria), ASHRAE member (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) . Partecipa regolarmente come relatore a conferenze e convegni nel settore HVAC e dell’energia. E’ docente in corsi di progettazione termotecnica, sicurezza impianti, efficienza energetica e prevenzione legionella.
Ing. Gaetano Trovato

Ultimi post di Ing. Gaetano Trovato (vedi tutti)

Lascia un commento

Analisi CFD nel settore HVAC

Considividi l’articolo

Nella progettazione di impianti HVAC è pratica comune assumere importanti decisioni riguardanti il design impiantistico basandosi sulla pratica costruttiva oppure su basi analitiche prettamente teoriche. Ad esempio, sappiamo che la possibilità di realizzare impianti a tutta aria per la climatizzazione invernale di ambienti con altezze elevate è limitata dalla problematica della climatizzazione dell’aria. Allo stesso modo, è nota la necessità di “lavare” le pareti vetrati di ambienti caratterizzati da elevate temperature ed umidità relativa, quali le piscine, per evitare la formazione di condensa sulle stesse. Si potrebbe proseguire a lungo con esempi a tal riguardo. Benché le conoscenze pratiche e teoriche facciano indubitabilmente parte integrante del bagaglio di esperienza di un progettista, la necessità di migliorare ed ottimizzare il più possibile gli impianti meccanici, ed in particolare quelli a servizio della climatizzazione ambientale, richiede soluzioni più accurate e ricercate sulla base del singolo caso specifico oggetto di progettazione.

 

img211
Figura 1: Andamento della velocità dell’aria su profilo NACA-0012 – Fonte: Direct Numerical Simulation of Flows over an NACA-0012 Airfoil at low and Moderate Reynolds Numbers (NASA)

Al fine di soddisfare questa crescente richiesta di accuratezza e precisione, i progettisti possono ricorrere ad uno strumento estremamente potente: la fluidodinamica computazionale (CFD, acronimo dall’inglese Computer Fluid Dynamics). L’utilizzo della CFD permette infatti di ottenere una soluzione numerica, calcolata attraverso metodi ricorsivi, delle complesse equazioni di Navier-Stokes che, come è noto, governano la dinamica dei fluidi. In pratica, la fluidodinamica computazionale permette di dare una forma precisa e puntuale, nel tempo e nello spazio alle spesso fumose soluzioni analitiche che, anche quando ottenibili, risultano essere troppo complesse per l’utilizzo nella progettazione pratica.

Tornando all’esempio, esposto in precedenza, degli impianti ad aria per la climatizzazione invernale di ambienti con altezze elevate, sappiamo che per limitare il fenomeno della stratificazione dell’aria è necessario immettere in ambiente un numero considerevole di ricambi orari d’aria (almeno 5/6 volumi/ora). Ma esattamente, qual è il numero di ricambi orari necessari per ottenere un comfort dell’aria accettabile? A questa domanda, ogni progettista risponderà fornendo la sua versione, basata sulla propria esperienza pregressa. La CFD ci permette invece di risolvere questo problema con certezza: impostando correttamente il modello ed assumendo adeguate condizioni al contorno è possibile prevedere quale sarà la distribuzione di temperatura all’interno dell’intero ambiente, comprendendo immediatamente quanto incida la stratificazione dell’aria. In questo modo, grazie alla CFD, potremmo valutare la fattibilità di un impianto ad aria basandoci su ipotesi ben più solide: conosceremo l’esatta portata d’aria da immettere in ambiente, alle condizioni fissate, necessaria per portare l’ambiente stesso alla temperatura desiderata nei tempi previsti.

Si può pertanto fare un’interessante considerazione riguardo l’utilizzo della CFD per la progettazione di impianti HVAC: la fluidodinamica computazionale semplifica l’attività di progettazione aggiungendovi livelli di complessità. Perché questa apparente contraddizione? La CFD permette di sviluppare i progetti lungo direttrici che sono tipicamente impedite alla progettazione tradizionale, consentendo di spingere i progetti verso livelli di accuratezza sempre maggiori.

Per comprendere meglio le possibilità collegate all’utilizzo della CFD, ma anche le relative criticità, è sicuramente utile analizzare il tipico work-flow di una simulazione fluidodinamica. I passaggi necessari per ottenere dei risultati affidabili e fisicamente coerenti sono così riassumibili:

  1. Pre-Processing
  2. Validazione del modello
  3. Post-Processing

Il Pre-Processing comprende tutte quelle attività propedeutiche e necessarie all’avvio delle simulazioni numeriche. Per prima cosa sarà pertanto necessario definire la geometria all’interno della quale lanciare la simulazione, ovvero il volume di controllo; al fine di ottenere risultati coerenti è necessario che la geometria presenti un elevato livello di dettaglio. Stabilita la geometria, si procede alla definizione del modello fisico, impostando tutte le equazioni che definiscono l’oggetto della simulazione. Scegliere correttamente le equazioni che governano la simulazione è di fondamentale importanza per trovare un corretto bilanciamento tra l’accuratezza della soluzione ed il tempo di calcolo. In questa fase è inoltre definire le cosiddette condizioni al contorno, ovvero tutte le condizioni iniziali imposte dal caso specifico, nonché le ipotesi proposte per l’impostazione della simulazione.

Terminato il Pre-Processing è necessario validare il modello appena definito per permetterne l’utilizzo al variare di alcune condizioni e consentirne dunque l’utilizzo: sarebbe impensabile realizzare un differente modello per ogni minima modifica apportata ad esso. La validazione del modello è però il passaggio più complesso nell’ambito della fluidodinamica computazionale; durante la validazione è infatti necessario effettuare le seguenti operazioni:

  1. Realizzazione della Mesh: Si definisce “mesh” la discretizzazione del volume di controllo. Una mesh è formata da un gran numero di celle di forme e dimensioni variabili decise dal progettista: per ogni cella il programma calcolerà tutte le proprietà del fluido (velocità, pressione, etc.). La realizzazione della mesh è, escludendo il tempo computazionale vero e proprio, l’operazione più lunga nell’ambito delle simulazioni CFD ed ha evidentemente un’importanza fondamentale. Una trattazione più attenta del “meshing”, nonché delle problematiche ad esso legate, è disponibili qui [NOTE: Add link to the entry about “meshing”].

impeller

Figura 2: Mesh relativa alla girante di una pompa centrifuga – Fonte: truegrid.com/cfdgallery

 

2.  Scelta ed impostazione del risolutore: Costruita la mesh, è necessario scegliere il risolutore più adeguato per l’applicazione in oggetto. Senza entrare nel dettaglio dei complessi algoritmi che si nascondono dietro le sigle (PISO, SIMPLE, etc.) che tipicamente si incontrano quando ci si avvicina alla CFD, bisogna sapere che ciascun risolutore calcola la soluzione numerica attraverso algoritmi iterativi. Le equazioni di partenza sono le medesime, ma varia l’ordine in cui queste vengono risolte, nonché l’utilizzo dei correttori numerici necessari per migliorare la stabilità della simulazione.

3. Ottenimento della soluzione preliminare: Una volta scelto il risolutore più adatto per l’esigenza, si può finalmente lanciare una simulazione preliminare. Se tutti i precedenti passaggi sono stati effettuati correttamente, il simulatore restituirà una soluzione. Questa deve essere innanzitutto confrontata con le soluzioni analitiche: la soluzione ottenuta è fisicamente sensata ed è coerente con quanto ci saremmo aspettati? In caso di risposta affermativa, si può procedere con la validazione del modello, altrimenti sarà necessario rivedere le operazioni svolte in precedenza.

4. Controlli di convergenza: l’ottenimento di una soluzione accettabile non è certamente sufficiente per poter considerare validato il modello realizzato. In seguito sarà necessario procedere con le simulazioni per raffinare la soluzione, ovvero migliorarne la convergenza, e per verificare che la soluzione ottenuta non sia frutto di condizioni particolari non imposte direttamente dal progettista. Se anche questo passaggio viene superato con successo, il modello si può infine considerare validato.

HVAC simulation server room CFD streamlines

Figura 3: Linee di flusso dell’aria in un data center – Fonte: simscale.com

 

Avendo in mano un modello computazionale corretto e stabile si potranno simulare le diverse condizioni richieste nell’ambito della progettazione. I risultati della simulazioni saranno però interminabili tabelle di numeri, di fatto incomprensibili. Per tradurre questi risultati in qualcosa di utilizzabili dovranno essere utilizzati degli strumenti di Post-Processing che permetteranno di circoscrivere i risultati esposti a quelli più interessanti, nonché di ottenere soluzioni grafiche facilmente comprensibili ed utilizzabili.

Abbiamo voluto fornire un assaggio dei dilemmi progettuali che la fluidodinamica computazionale è in grado di aiutare a risolvere, nonché dare un’idea di quanto possa essere complesso impostare correttamente le simulazioni CFD. Bisogna però ricordare che l’utilizzo della CFD non è da considerarsi sostitutivo rispetto agli strumenti della progettazione tradizionale: al fine di implementare correttamente un modello fluidodinamico coerente e fisicamente sensato è infatti necessario avere una buona padronanza delle equazioni analitiche che governano la dinamica dei fluidi, ovvero le già citate equazioni di Navier-Stokes. Inoltre, al fine di ottenere soluzioni utili e coerenti in tempi ragionevoli e con costi di progettazione contenuti, è necessario che il progettista circoscriva correttamente il problema postogli, evitando di disperdere tempo ed energie in simulazioni inutili, se non dannose.

 

The following two tabs change content below.
Ing. Gaetano Trovato

Ing. Gaetano Trovato

Progettista e Consulente per importanti società ed enti nel settore HVAC e dell’energia, sia in ambito civile terziario che industriale ed è titolare e fondatore di STT ENGINEERING. E’ autore di numerosi articoli scientifici su riviste internazionali e nazionali nel settore HVAC, della cogenerazione e dell’efficienza energetica. Si occupa di simulazioni CFD principalmente nel settore impiantistivo e dello scambio termico e del controllo della contaminazione ambientale (cleanroom). EGE (esperto gestione energia) certificato  UNI CEI 11339 settore civile ed industriale. Perito e Consulente Tecnico di Ufficio Tribunale di Milano (isc. Settore Termotecnica ed Energia). Membro AICARR (Associazione Italiana Condizionamento dell’aria, ASCCA (Associazione Contaminazione e Controllo dell’aria), ASHRAE member (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) . Partecipa regolarmente come relatore a conferenze e convegni nel settore HVAC e dell’energia. E’ docente in corsi di progettazione termotecnica, sicurezza impianti, efficienza energetica e prevenzione legionella.
Ing. Gaetano Trovato

Ultimi post di Ing. Gaetano Trovato (vedi tutti)

Lascia un commento